Monroe County Family Coalition

Monroe County Family Coalition

You can make a difference

Monroe County Family Coalition

You can make a difference

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Invest-in-Others-Logo-01.png

MCFC has been selected as an award recipient for the Invest in Others 2023 Grant for Change through Vision Financial Group

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A special recognition and heartfelt thanks go to Priscilla Parker, our dedicated community partner, committee member, and financial broker for Vision Financial Group. Priscilla's exceptional dedication and passion in working on the Invest in Others 2023 to secure this grant are truly commendable. MCFC is profoundly grateful for her unwavering commitment to serving the community.

At MCFC, we are dedicated to empowering underserved communities for a brighter future by providing robust support to enrich the community and dismantling the stigma that continues to plague our underserved communities. It's about change, and we are committed to being a part of the change to empower the people we serve!



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Celebrate Black History Month


Highlighting the achievements and societal contributions of diverse peoples is important year-round, and occasions like Asian Pacific American Heritage Month in May and Native American Heritage Month in November serve to uplift the voices in these groups.   In February, the national spotlight is put on African Americans with the celebration of Black History Month.

  From innovators to artists to White House staff, there’s plenty to celebrate when it comes to Black culture in the United States. If you need a refresher on why Black History Month was created and what it means, here’s what you need to know.   Black History Month is celebrated annually in February.  This year is a leap year, so Black History Month gets an extra day of celebration from Feb. 1 to Feb. 29.   Black History Month celebrates the history and achievements of Black people in the U.S. from any period of national history.   From the enslaved people first brought to America on slave ships in the early 17th century to modern descendants of those very same ancestors, Black History Month shines a light on Black culture in America and reminds society of the many ways this community has contributed to and enriched the nation, according to National Geographic Kids.

Notable figure often highlighted during Black History Month include Mae Jemison, who became the first female African American astronaut to travel in space in 1992 (and who also [delivered the commencement address for the University of Delaware’s graduating class of 2023!]

(https://www.delawareonline.com/story/news/education/graduation/2023/05/27/university-delaware-2023-graduation-mae-jemison/70259791007/; Barack Obama, who was elected as the first Black president of the U.S. in 2008; Thurgood Marshall, who was the first Black justice appointed to the United States Supreme Court in 1967; and Martin Luther King Jr., who advocated for equal rights for Black people during the Civil Rights Movement.  And that’s just to name a few. 

Black History Month has been around for decades, but the first iteration of how the month is now celebrated began nearly a century ago.   Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard-trained historian, wanted to raise awareness about African Americans’ contributions to society and, along with the organization he founded, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, Negro History Week was created in 1925, according to Black History Month.

The first Negro History Week was celebrated during a week in February in 1926 that honored the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The result was an overwhelming amount of support in the form of Black history clubs forming, teachers requesting materials to teach their students about Black history and progressive white Americans endorsing the effort, too.
 
By Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week became a staple for Black culture, with more Americans joining the celebration and mayors of cities across the nation issuing proclamations for the observation of Negro History Week. The Black Awakening and the Civil Rights Movement further propelled the recognition of Black contributions, and in 1976, Negro History Week was expanded to a monthlong occasion. 

President Gerald R. Ford emphasized the importance of highlighting Black Americans past and present during Black History Month, and since then, each American president has issued Black History Month proclamations, with the Association for the Study of African American Life and History continuing to promote the study of Black history all year, according to History.

Story by Krys'tal Griffin, Delaware News Journal





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Monroe County Family Coalition
Monroe County Family Coalition





Making a Difference with MCFC

Monroe County Family Coalition, Inc. (MCFC) is a nonprofit organiztion formed by a group of Monroe County parents, teachers, and counselors, in the wake of the Black Families Matter rally that was held on June 20, 2020. The community within Greece, NY, came together with a vision to create opportunities for families to bring about change, and bridge inequality gaps in the community.


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MCFC_LOVE EVENT


To consistently explore innovative ways to advocate on behalf of families within our region


The Mission of the MCFC


To connect local families to community resources and bridge the gap between local government and partnering agencies and at-risk youth and families. To create safe places for a courageous dialog between various entities within the community that addresses diverse contentious matters.


Vision:


Creating opportunities for families to bring about change and bridge inequality gaps in the community.


Core values:


  1. To serve the community with integrity.
  2. To be committed to dependability.
  3. To consistently explore innovative ways to advocate on behalf of families




MCFC_LOVE EVENT
MCFC_LOVE EVENT


As we celebrate this new American holiday, let us take a stand against racism, educate ourselves on racial justice issues, and actively support organizations that work to eradicate racism in our community. Wishing You and Your Family Happy Juneteenth Day!



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One Day at a Time… We can make a difference. Acceptance, humility, patience and understanding. These ideals will bring about change for ourselves and our relationships. And in time . . . To the world!